Posts by: Eric Minton

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[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/11/2014
I am not aware of any member of the Ex3 staff saying that we're going to strip away nuance from the Realm, and short of an entirely unambiguous citation to that effect, I can only see this as an example of the typical internet fashion for interpreting a statement in the most uncharitable possible manner.

"I'd like to depict our empires in a realistic manner, but readers sheltered from the unwholesome elements of empire will view that as cartoonishly evil" is in no way the same as "I'd like to strip away nuance from our empires, so that instead of being realistic they will be cartoonishly evil." I should not have to explain this to anyone.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/10/2014
Another playtest report, focused on social influence and investigation:

Marst Chronicle: Session #3

[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/10/2014
(Although I do think that a Realm scholar, upon learning of Earth, could make a reasoned argument that by his lights, the United States is "worse" than the Realm.)

[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/10/2014
Okay.

Let's say we're working the third edition of Exalted Modern, the game of playing nascent demigods reborn on Earth. Previous editions described the setting of Earth in detail, but often glossed over the economic and political underpinnings of modern industrialized societies. In a discussion thread, Lea brings up the fact that previous editions didn't pay much attention to the costs of First World hegemony, and that 3e would delineate connections between the wealth and power of, say, the United States, and a history of economic exploitation of other nations, deposing democratically elected leaders, supporting authoritarian regimes, increasing environmental damage, widespread social and economic inequality, etc.

Does this mean that Lea is planning to make Exalted Modern's America the Evil Empire, that everyone there is Snidely Whiplash, and that your characters are justified in glassing the place with nuclear fire?

(note: I am in no way suggesting that the United States is as bad, by our lights, as the Realm, so please don't read the above as suggesting such)

[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/10/2014
Originally posted by BrilliantRain View Post
The main reason I wand some degree of moral relativism in Exalted is so that you can have a society that needs help, but that is also worth saving.
We don't go into setting design by categorizing which societies are "worth saving" and which aren't. That's for your PCs to decide based on their own mores.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/10/2014
Welcome to my world.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/9/2014
Originally posted by Eric Minton View Post
On the other hand, some characters will look around and say, “All it takes to make a better world is good intentions and common sense, so anyone who’s ever caused harm is a monster or a fool.” This is a character flaw.
To clarify, I consider this to be a character flaw not because of anything it says directly about morality or ethics, but because I consider it a character flaw to deliberately refuse to acknowledge that the world is a complicated place where moral and ethical problems don't always have easy answers. I stand by this.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/9/2014
Originally posted by hippokrene View Post
You’re conflating people with their PCs.
PCs neither create themselves, nor run themselves at the table.

If you create a PC with some universalist ethics and say that she's drawing on some extant philosophical system in Creation, or she's a visionary, or what-have-you, that's awesome!

If you create a PC with some universalist ethics because you aren't really thinking things through and assume that's normal in Creation, and then treat every NPC you meet as a monster because they don't share that moral code, that's not the PC's fault; that's on the player.

Originally posted by hippokrene View Post
I read this part several times to be sure. Either you missed something here, or you’ve said that anyone who considers the Realm evil is sanctimonious.
Saying, “This fictional culture does shitty things, by my lights” is not sanctimonious.

Saying, “Oh, if I were living in this fictional culture, I would do everything in my power to make it a better place, no matter the risk or the cost; therefore everyone in this fictional culture who doesn’t do so is evil”… that’s sanctimonious. And it's an attitude I've seen crop up in enough Exalted discussions that I feel it's worth responding to.


Originally posted by hippokrene View Post
This doesn’t even resemble the human race in passing.

If anything, modern American culture is stuffed with people who are fixated on the immorality they perceive in their fellow citizens and government.
That’s because cultural fault lines run through our societies as well. We fixate on the perceived immorality of that political party, that ethnicity, that part of the country—factions and people who are technically fellow citizens or part of our shared government, but who aren’t part of our in-group.


Originally posted by hippokrene View Post
‘It happens in the reality’ justifies not one creative decision that has ever been made or will ever be made.
I’m calling bullshit on this, because A) verisimilitude is a perfectly reasonable creative goal, and B) saying “who cares whether it’s realistic?” is one of the justifications for stuff like “I don’t want any gays in my fictional universe,” and to hell with that.


Originally posted by hippokrene View Post
A quote comes to mind. “We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”

A character who expects others to tell the truth and honor their word does not have a character flaw. A character who decides it’s wrong for an army to rape and pillage lands they’ve conquered does not have a character flaw. A character who believes that members of a community should give succor to the ill, elderly, and infirm does not have a character flaw.
There’s nothing wrong with looking at everyone else’s failure to create a better world without causing harm in the process, and saying, “These people have tried and failed, or are too tired or fearful or caught up in petty concerns to try, or the better world they are reaching for is a worse world in my eyes. I will try my best to do better.” This is not a character flaw.

On the other hand, some characters will look around and say, “All it takes to make a better world is good intentions and common sense, so anyone who’s ever caused harm is a monster or a fool.” This is a character flaw.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/8/2014
I'd find a glossary or online translator for the desired real-world language and grab some words from there, possibly mashing them together like Play-Doh until you get names that sound right to your ear.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/8/2014
Originally posted by Jerrik View Post
It was from Infernals. Chapter One, Page 27.
Thanks for the citation! But given the source, I think it can be safely ignored.

(Interestingly, Chapter 5 of Infernals gets it right with its examples of the geas.)

[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/8/2014
Originally posted by Blaque View Post
Define "better".
This is the key to the issue. Teleological analysis requires absolute morality to have meaning, and Creation is explicitly a setting without moral absolutes.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/8/2014
Originally posted by Isator Levi View Post
Yes, that whole notion that the geas entails being able to give absolute commands to the Incarnae is pretty stupid, isn't it?
To the best of my knowledge, that notion is pure fanon. I've just done some searches through PDFs of various supplements, and I can't find any reference to the geas as anything other than a ban against attacking the Primordials.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/8/2014
Thanks, MrInsecure. Well put.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/8/2014
Originally posted by HK-87 View Post
Eric can talk about how evil the real world is
If this is what people are taking away from the post, then I have failed to communicate effectively.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 6/8/2014
Originally posted by Gayo View Post
ps Minton I think some of those archery iambs are actually trochees
Thanks for catching that! This is why editors are important.