Posts by: Eric Minton

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[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/12/2014
Originally posted by BrilliantRain View Post
Now, I'm not a biblical scholar, but, my understanding of the story is that, while Jesus was out healing the sick and bringing hope to everyone, one of his relatives became ill. Now, had Jesus been there, he could have cured it trivially, but it took too long for the messenger to find him and for them to get back, so Lazarus was dead when they arrived. Then, Jesus tells him to get up and, after some prodding, Lazarus does. This is, iirc, the only recorded instance of anyone coming back to life in the Bible, other than Jesus.

Now, looking at that, I'm... not entirely sure anything can be done with it, without functionally making death as cheap as it is in D&D. Yet ...I dunno. Once in an entire game feels like it could work. On the other hand, mugging a guy for xp for a one use charm, even one like this, seems crass.

I dunno. I mean, I'm sure the situation is going to happen in games where Medicine is important. The Solar Healer fails to get there in time to save someone and it's depressing. Is there a way that a Solar can say "...No. NO! I am GOING to SAVE this Person and I don't CARE if it's IMPOSSIBLE!" and have it actually work, without it being either a Liminal's backstory or breaking the setting in half?
Can a Solar physician bring someone back from the dead? Nope. Dead is dead.

Can you replay the story of Lazarus? Sure, more or less! The poor man isn't actually dead; he's simply so close to death that none of his fellows can perceive his weak and fading vital signs. But the Solar physician can, and her transcendent skill can save his life!

[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/12/2014
Originally posted by hippokrene View Post
Like what?
Ixcoatli, Ysyr, Randan...

[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/12/2014
Originally posted by hippokrene View Post
The edge of the map seems reserved for unimportant stuff.
Some of the coolest places in the setting are at the edges of the map.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/11/2014
"shadowland: In the Second Age, the line between the Underworld and Creation is perilously thin. A shadowland is an area where constant ghostly activity or powerful negative geomancy have brought the two worlds together. Those who cross into the area in either world always arrive at the shadowland, but when they depart, they will always arrive in the lands of the living if they cross the region's border during the day or in the Underworld if they depart at night. Shadowlands are dismal places, haunted by hungry ghosts and the evil spirits of Creation, who thrive on the negative energy there." — Exalted: the Abyssals, p. 13

Originally posted by Isator Levi View Post
The spatial relationships aspect of shadowlands has always confounded me a bit. The implication of shadowlands "becoming part of the Underworld" at night in how passing the border brings you into a place outside of the corresponding location seems to be that the shadowland becomes its corresponding location in the Underworld at night, but then... what happens to what was there already? If I build a house in a part of the Underworld that corresponds directly to, say, that amphitheater in Thorns during the day, what happens to it at night? Does it appear in the middle of the amphitheater? Does it cease to exist for the night? What if it actually overlaps with another structure?
There is no separate "shadowlands Thorns" and "Underworld Thorns." There is only Thorns.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/11/2014
Originally posted by Robert Vance View Post
"Hero with a magical dog" is too rich and resonant a thing to not eventually show up somehow as an Exigent design. It is plausible that an Exigent that fulfilled that role might also be designed to be compatible with other choices of magical companion species.
I can think of one noteworthy example.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/10/2014
Originally posted by Isator Levi View Post
Also, Jochim was active within living memory of some of the older ones; that was a war so severe that a few satrapies had to be abandoned for years to deal with it.
This is still the case in 3e. The Bull of the North wasn't the first Solar to raise armies and states against the Realm, nor is he the first to survive the initial military retaliation by the Realm legions. That the others all eventually fell does not mean they are all forgotten.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/9/2014
Aw man. Technically I'm a playtester. Gotta go...

[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/8/2014
Originally posted by Lafing Cat View Post
Dice-induced failure isn't offensive to me. Dice-induced instant death often is. (Assuming we're not, you know, playing Paranoia or something).

(As for .1%, with 4000 people backing exalted, at 4 people / game, that's 1000 games. So a 1/1000 event has a better than even chance of showing up in someone's first exalted session)


I wasn't talking about charms either. Regardless of the method, I don't think "One-shotting characters in the first round of combat" are what dice are supposed to do.
"One-shotting characters in the first round of combat" simply isn't something that a Storyteller can do to a PC by accident, no matter how many times you roll the dice. This is made clear in Holden's public explanations of the 3e combat engine.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/8/2014
Originally posted by wulf View Post
When I look at maps of the West, a few Islands have one city and that's pretty much it.
The only published map of the West proper that I'm aware of is in Compass of Terrestrial Directions: The West, which shows several islands with multiple cities and towns on them, such as the four cities on the isle of Abalone.

If you're talking about maps of Creation as a whole, that's a matter of scale. Can you imagine how weird it would be if, say, 21st century Norway had only Oslo and the rest of it was uninhabited? That's what you might think if you looked at a typical map of the modern world, because such maps only show the largest and most important population centers. The same applies to maps of Creation. The island of, say, Abalone is no more uninhabited outside of Wavecrest than Norway is uninhabited outside of Oslo.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/5/2014
Originally posted by Winged Cat View Post
Could you please make sure this is clear in their writeup in Ex3 Core? Of course you don't want to give spoilers now, but as the West is written in Ex2, there does not seem to be a good reason why it participates on the Order Conferring Trade Pattern enough to keep the western Bordermarches from simply advancing to somewhere around Bluehaven and swallowing up most of the West. (Unless the islands to Bluehaven's west get enough trade to hold those Bordermarches about a couple thousand miles back, and said Bordermarches are in a line going all the way to the North, thus sparing Coral, the Neck, et al. But pushing that far seems unlikely.)
The West as written in 3e is not the West as written in 2e. There's no hidden mysterious cryptic explanation that's wrapped in a riddle that's stuffed in an enigma that's tucked into a sidebar somewhere, which you otherwise wouldn't be able to guess at.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/5/2014
Originally posted by Gayo View Post
I'm curious -- when this sort of thing gets cut, is it just a wordcount issue, or is there a logistic/thematic rationale?
Both. A couple of locations weren't quite up to snuff, and even if wordcount wasn't an issue, they would have been sent back for extensive revision or cut entirely. Most of the locations that were cut were good enough for publication but had to go in order to bring the chapter down to the allotted wordcount, but which ones were cut depended in large part on the thematic needs of the core.

Originally posted by BrilliantRain View Post
Eric, I don't suppose you could indicate whether or not the cut material might show up in that future book on the West? If necessary, you are allowed to assume you will be writing part of said book, for the purposes of the question.
Some cut material will show up in future books. Other cut material will not. We don't yet know which is which.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/5/2014
Of the thirteen Western locales written up in my Threshold draft, nine have thus far survived Lea's red pen. Three of these are familiar from 1e/2e. Six are new.

[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/4/2014
Originally posted by TheCountAlucard View Post
Or they were just trying to be funny.
As opposed to the stark realism of the typical Exalted game!

[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/4/2014
Originally posted by Chejop Kejak View Post
Of course, the Virtue that I do see everyone raise is Conviction. The classic Virtue Of Doing What I Was Going To Do Anyway.
A common misunderstanding. It's actually the Virtue of Doing What I Was Originally Planning To Do Before Circumstances Changed.

You'll find an excellent example of Conviction-based trouble in the Futurama episode "The Farnsworth Parabox." Hermes Conrad has been instructed by his employer, Dr. Farnsworth, to throw a box into the sun. At the end of the episode, with the box in an airlock and Hermes about to press the airlock release button, all of his fellow cast members spew out of the box to form a giant hamster pile in the airlock. Farnsworth proceeds to pound on the airlock door shouting "Hermes, don't press that button!" Hermes then spends several seconds with his finger poised over the button, looking back and forth between the button and Farnsworth's terrified face, before saying "OK" and letting the crew back onto the ship. Due to his high Conviction, he clearly had to spend Willpower to stop himself from moving forward with his original plan and ejecting the box (along with his employer and colleagues) into the sun.

On the other hand, maybe that's Temperance. Virtues are hard!

[#][F] Eric Minton - 2/3/2014
Ah, yes, ‘The West.' The impoverished Direction of insignificant islands allegedly waiting in deep ocean. We have dismissed this claim.